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reuterspictures:

Gallery: Remains of D-Day

World War II sites in Normandy as seen from the air. REUTERS/Christian Hartmann

Occasionally I sense an insane wail deep down in the pit, the echo alone reaching me, striking without warning, a child weeping uninhibitedly, imprisoned forever
by Ingmar Bergman (The Magic Lantern)

(Source: alfsaga)

nprfreshair:

By Varun Thota via This Is Colossal 
marcusblaque:

Jesse Feinman - An Atheist on a Date
artgods:

People, walking

Anonymous asked: Define tumblr in 3 words.

sickpage:

shut up

our-greater-perhaps:

THIS WAS MY FAVORITE SCENE FROM THE ENTIRE SPONGEBOB SQUAREPANTS TV SERIES

(Source: poisonseaurchins, via kygarbs)

(Source: pinkmanjesse)

strange days (at Loving Me First)
theatlantic:

Meaningful Activities Protect the Brain From Depression

Our entire lives, when you think about it, are built around rewards — the pursuit of money, fun, love, and tacos.
How we seek and respond to those rewards is part of what determines our overall happiness. Aristotle famously said there were two basic types of joy: hedonia, or that keg-standing, Netflix binge-watching, Nutella-from-the-jar selfish kind of pleasure, and eudaimonia, or the pleasure that comes from helping others, doing meaningful work, and otherwise leading a life well-lived.
Recent psychological research has suggested that this second category is more likely to produce a lasting increase in happiness. Hedonic rewards may generate a short-term burst of glee, but it dissipates more quickly than the surge created by the more selfless eudaimonic rewards.
"Happiness without meaning characterizes a relatively shallow, self-absorbed or even selfish life, in which things go well, needs and desire are easily satisfied, and difficult or taxing entanglements are avoided," a study in the Journal of Positive Psychology found last year.
Read more. [Image: Natesh Ramasamy/flickr/Olga Khazan]